Healthy Apple Muffins

Trust me, no one will suspect that these fluffy cinnamon apple muffins are healthy! cookieandkate.com

It’s apple muffin time! You all really seem to love my banana muffins, pumpkin muffins and carrot muffins, so today, apple muffins are joining the club. Like the others in the bunch, these muffins are made with 100 percent whole wheat flour and naturally sweetened with maple syrup or honey. They are nice and fluffy, with just enough sweetness to be irresistible.

apples

Granted, I already have an apple oatmeal muffin recipe on the blog from four years ago, but I have significantly upped my muffin game since then and declare these to be the better of the two. I based these healthy apple muffins off my carrot muffins, replacing grated carrots with grated and chopped apple (I used two Granny Smith apples), and replacing half of the Greek yogurt with applesauce.

These apple muffins taste even better after resting for a few hours, if they last that long, and I particularly enjoy them with a spread of peanut butter. Check my recipe notes for how to use honey instead of maple syrup, and some ideas for how to make the muffins vegan. I think it’s time for another!

Continue to the recipe…

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5 Benefits of Coconut Oil

Coconut Sorbet-2

Like Edith Piaf, I’m not someone who has many regrets. Except one rather large one…

The years I spent working in the food industry developing ‘healthy’ snacks for a multinational breakfast cereal company.

When I think about the time I spent coming up with creative ways to make these ‘97% fat free’ products taste palatable, it still makes me feel a little icky.

Of course at the time I had no idea that the grains, dried fruits and sugars which were part of our ‘healthy’ ingredient arsenal were anything but good for our consumers.

I was fresh from my food science program at university where the nutrition team had talked endlessly about the perils of fats in general and saturated fat in particular. Naively I believed what I was taught.

But over the years, I’ve kept my education going. And my reading along with my self experimentation means it’s been years since I’ve been afraid of fat. Even saturated fat.

I eat eggs for breakfast most days. I adore cheese. I even look forward to gnawing on the fatty parts of a lamb cutlet (sorry vegetarian friends!).

And the best part?

I’ve never found it easier to manage my weight (well apart from this whole baby bump thing 😉

So when I get an email like this one from Erica, it makes me both angry and sad.

“I’m very keen to learn the latest views on coconut oil and saturated fats. I was always told that coconut milk and coconut oil were very high in ‘bad fats’ and that they should be avoided at all costs when cooking. But lately I have seen coconut oil products on the shelf in the supermarket (cooking spray) and I’ve also noticed that foodies are now recommending the use of coconut oil for cooking due to stability at high temperatures and health benefits.

I love coconut and would like to reintroduce some of these products in my cooking, but I’m still concerned about the warnings I’ve received in the past and I don’t want to risk my family’s health. Can you please clear up my confusion?”
Erica

It’s a great reminder that not everyone knows that ‘low fat’ and even ‘low saturated fat’ is not the way forward.

So lets talk about the benefits of coconut oil…

5 Benefits of Coconut Oil

1. It’s delicious!
I’m a believer in the adage that healthy food must taste good as well. Otherwise it’s possibly not as ‘healthy’ as you’d think (like my fructose laden ‘cereal bars’). I love to have a teaspoon straight out of the jar.

2. It’s stable at higher temperatures.
Which means it’s difficult to burn. So it’s great for cooking, especially stir frying and pan frying. For more on which oils I use and why see the Great Stonesoup Oil Crisis.

3. It helps our internal antioxidant systems.
Because it’s a rich source of MCTs (medium chain triglycerides), coconut oil provides the building blocks to make a molecule called beta-HBA which improves antioxidant function. It’s also helpful in treating Alzhiemer’s disease.

4. It’s a superfuel for the brain
And can help promote brain health by stimulating the growth of new brain cells.

5. It helps boost your immune system
The fats found in coconut oil (and butter) can help white blood cells recognize and destroy invading germs and tumours.

Source: Grain Bran by David Perlmutter.

But what about the Saturated Fat in Coconut Oil?

Isn’t it going to block our arteries? And cause all sorts of problems.

In a word. No.

According to neurologist Dr David Perlmutter in his book Grain Brain, current thinking (from 2010) in the American Journal of Nutrition is that eating more saturated fat isn’t linked to higher risk of heart disease, cardiovascular disease or stroke.

Like to learn more about the benefits of fats?

Including saturated fat? Then I recommend reading ‘Grain Brain’ by neurologist Dr David Perlmutter. It’s a fascinating read.

And I’d love to hear what you think? Leave a comment below and share where you’re at with the whole saturated fat thing…

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Coconut ‘Sorbet’

Since I’ve been including variations for dairy-free and vegan options on my recipes, I usually include coconut sorbet as an alternative to vanilla ice cream or cream to top sweet treats and cakes. While there are some great commercial coconut sorbets out there, they can be hard to find so here’s my recipe.

enough for: 2-4 as a side
takes: 10 minutes + 6 hours freezing
1 can coconut cream, unsweetened (400mL / 14oz)
1 ripe pear or banana
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)
stevia, rice malt syrup or maple syrup, to taste (optional)

1. Place coconut cream in a ziplock bag. Place in the freezer until frozen, about 6 hours.

2. Chop pear or banana (peeling banana first) into chunks and place in another ziplock bag. Freeze.

3. About 15 minutes before you’re ready to serve the sorbet, remove the coconut cream and fruit from the freezer.

4. Bash the coconut cream in the bag to break into chunks (or throw it on the floor). Remove coconut chunks from the bag and place in a food processor along with the frozen fruit.

5. Whizz with the vanilla (if using) until you have a soft-serve sorbet consistency. This will take a while so be patient. If it’s not coming together add a few tablespoons water to hasten the process.

6. Taste and add your preferred sweetener (if needed). When you’re happy, serve asap or place in a container and return to the freezer for up to an hour. Longer than this and your sorbet will start to turn icy but will still be edible.

Variations

coconut milk – is fine will just be less rich than coconut cream.

no fruit / low carb sorbet – you could skip the fruit for a lower carb sorbet but you’ll need to add some stevia or other sweetener.

other fruit – feel free to play around! Berries are awesome and for a tropical vibe frozen mango or pineapple (or both) are delicious.

boozy – add a splash of vodka or white rum.

Video Version of the Recipe.

Big love,
Jules x

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PS. On something completely unrelated…

Just wanted to mention a program I’m a part of that I don’t have any regrets about supporting!

It’s called ‘A Simple Year‘. It’s a year long program of guided simplicity that focuses on simplifying a different area of your life each month.

Registration for this year ends 31st January 2016.

To make sure you don’t miss out, go to:
www.simpleyear.co/course

Screen Shot 2015-11-03 at 2.20.54 PM

NOTE: Registration ENDS 31st January.

_____________

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Simple Seedy Slaw

This healthy slaw recipe tastes amazing! It's made with a simple lemon dressing and features toasted sunflower and pumpkin seeds. Gluten free and vegan. - cookieandkate.com

How do you like that alliteration? Eh? Sorry, I couldn’t help myself. This slaw is just the ticket after an indulgent weekend with a strong Aziz Ansari theme. I accidentally watched the entire season of Master of None on Netflix on Saturday (it’s that good), and plowed through two-thirds of Modern Romance last night.

Mind you, I took some breaks to take bites of this amazing chocolate pie thing I’ve been working on for my cookbook. And sure, I probably should have been writing my book all weekend, but then what would we talk about today? The weather? I did that last week.

cabbage

Let’s talk about this slaw. It’s proof that sometimes, the most humble of ingredients can make for the best recipes. Take cheap cabbage, with all of its potent antioxidants, and toss it with carrots and a simple, garlicky lemon dressing. Add some freshly toasted seeds to the mix (toasting them makes all the difference!) and you have a colorful coleslaw that’s bursting with fresh flavor and amazing health benefits.

Continue to the recipe…

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Do You Need a Spiralizer?

Zucchini Noodle Laksa

Want to know something I hate about cooking? Apart from washing up, my biggest ‘pet peeve’ is single-use kitchen gadgets. You know, the tools that only have one purpose.

As a lover of simplicity I can’t stand a cluttered kitchen with cupboards and drawers crammed full of stuff that hardly ever gets used.

Which is one of the reasons I put off buying a spiralizer for so long.

I already had the technology to make ‘pasta’ and ‘noodles’ from my veggies using either my mandoline or vegetable peeler.

But a few months ago I saw a photo on Instagram of someone’s spiralized zucchini noodles and I had to do a double take. Really. It looked like proper pasta.

After much deliberation, I decided to get myself a spiralizer to try it out. With the proviso that if it didn’t earn its keep, I’d donate it to charity.

Do you need a spiralizer?

No. It’s not something you need in the kitchen like a good sharp knife and chopping board.

But! I must admit I do love mine. It’s not going to charity any time soon.

The first time Fergal and I made our zucchini ‘noodles’ to serve with a ragu, my kitchen helper actually ate all of his zucchini (even with his toddler’s distrust of green vegetables). I can’t tell you how happy I was.

Which Veg Can You Spiralize?

1. Zucchini
My go-to noodles so far because of their mild flavour and pasta-like quality. Plus it’s zucchini season around here right now!

To prep: Make noodles then noodles then sprinkle with salt. Stand at room temp to soften and warm slightly for up to 3 hours. Use raw.
OR
To prep: Make noodles then cover with boiling water. Stand for 60 seconds then drain well.

2. Carrot
Stronger flavour and higher carb content than zucchini but super pretty! And a firmer bite.

To prep: Make noodles then cover with boiling water. Stand for 2 minutes (or longer for softer noodles) then drain well.
OR
To prep: Make noodles then then pan fry in a little oil or butter.

3. Beets
I haven’t tried beet noodles yet but imagine they’d be best raw in salads or prepped the same way as carrot noodles.

4. Parsnip
Something I haven’t tried yet but imagine they’d be best pan fried in a little oil or butter.

5. Celeriac
Also called celery root these noodles have a lovely sweetish flavour. And the colour is nice and pasta-like. A good Winter time noodle.

To prep: Make noodles then cover with boiling water. Stand for a few minutes then drain well.
OR
To prep: Make noodles then then pan fry in a little oil or butter.

6. Potatoes
Another spiralizer use I have yet to try. Have book marked this idea for post-pregnancy (and gestational diabetes). We had fried potato ‘squiggles’ at a restaurant in Sydney and they were off-the-scale good from a crunch perspective!

7. Sweet Potato
OMG. I hadn’t even thought about using sweet potato until I sat down to write this post. I’m thinking these might need to be gently simmered until no longer crunchy and then well drained. OR pan frying in butter or oil. If you try it – do report back!

3 Ways to Use Your Spiralizer

1. Pasta Substitutes
The obvious choice! But don’t be limited by just replacing your spaghetti in your spag bol. You can use your spiralized noodles with any of your favourite pasta sauces. Really there are no limits.

Some ideas to try:
Mushroom Ragu with Carrot Noodles
Baked Meatballs with Celeriac Noodles
Zucchini Noodles with Broccoli & Pine Nuts.
Zucchini Noodles with Sausages & Crushed Peas

2. Noodle Substitutes
It took me a little longer to think of this but your spiralized noodles work equally well with Asian noodle dishes. Sometime even more so than with Italian style dishes because there’s usually so much flavour going on the noodles only provide bulk and texture.

Don’t believe me? Then check out my Zucchini Laska recipe below.

More ideas:
Parsnip or celeriac or carrot noodles in this Simple Soba Noodle Soup.
Serve this stir fry with Zucchini noodles.
This Asian Beef with Zucchini Noodles.

3. Raw Salads
Think about your favourite shaved vegetable salads and your spiralized noodles can add a new textural element.

Some ideas to try:
Spiralized Carrot instead of grated in this Carrot Tabbouleh.
Spiralized Beets instead of grated in this Raw Beet Salad.
Spiralized Carrots in this Carrot Salad with Pesto & Cashews
Spiralized Celeriac instead of Cabbage in this Rolls Royce ‘Slaw

What about you?

Are you a spiralizer fan? Got any other tips for getting the most out of it? I’d love to hear in the comments below.

Zucchini Laksa

Laksa is the most delicious noodle soup that hails from Malaysia. It’s fragrant, it’s rich, it’s spicy. Plus there are noodles to slurp! Since focusing on eating grain-free and low carb, however, laksa has been off the menu at our place. But not any longer!

I was so excited when I had the idea to use some zucchini ‘noodles’ instead of the usual wheat or rice based laska noodles. It’s really that good!

enough for: 2
takes: 20 minutes
2 medium zucchini
1 jar laksa paste
1 can coconut milk (400mL / 14oz)
chicken 2-4 thighs, diced.
basil small bunch

1. Using a spiralizer, turn your zucchini into medium thick noodles. Sprinkle noodles with a little sea salt and stand while you make the soup.

2. Bring laksa paste and coconut milk to a simmer in a medium saucepan. Add chicken and continue to simmer until chicken is just cooked through (no longer pink.) About 5 minutes.

3. Add zucchini noodles and bring back to a simmer.

4. Taste and season with salt or fish sauce (if you have it). Some people might like a pinch of sugar.

5. To serve divide soup between two deep bowls and top with basil leaves.

Variations

no spiralizer – use a mandoline or vegetable peeler to slice zucchini into long ribbons then hand cut into medium ‘noodles’.

vegetarian / vegan – make sure your laksa paste is vegetarian and replace chicken with firm tofu chunks. Or use chunks of roast sweet potato instead. Cauliflower is also lovely – just simmer until florettes are tender.

carb lovers – add cooked hokkien, singapore or rice noodles with the zucchini noodles (or instead of the zucchini). Non purists could also use cooked spaghetti.

no laksa paste – use another thai curry paste like red or green curry or even an Indian curry paste. Just be careful to adjust the quantity to your liking (you probably won’t need a whole jar). The other option is to go for a coconut milk based soup so just skip the laksa paste and use a good squeeze of lime juice for some zing.

hot! – add finely sliced fresh red chilli.

no basil – you could skip it or replace with mint or coriander (cilantro) leaves.

more veg – add in chopped veg such as carrot, red capsicum (bell pepper), cauliflower and simmer until tender before adding the chicken. OR serve with a handful of rinsed bean sprouts.

Big love,
Jules x

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PS. Like some more simplicity in YOUR life?

Then I encourage you to checkout a special program I’m proud to be a part of. This year as a presenter AND a student!

It’s called ‘A Simple Year‘ and basically it’s a year long program of guided simplicity that focuses on simplifying a different area of your life each month.

Including cooking and eating. Which is where I come in.

For more details go to:
www.simpleyear.co/course

Screen Shot 2015-11-03 at 2.20.54 PM

NOTE: Registration ENDS 31st January.

_____________

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Kale Pesto Pizza

Kale pesto pizza with crispy kale on top! This is a simple weeknight pizza for kale lovers. cookieandkate.com

Attention kale lovers! I have a pizza for you. Everyone else, please shield your eyes and forgive me for the very green pizza on your screen. I’ve had this idea for a while now—kale pesto pizza with golden mozzarella and crispy kale on top—and it is finally reality. A very tasty reality, of which I am looking forward to eating again for lunch.

kale pecan pesto

As any good vegetarian blogger should be, I am obsessed with pesto, and basil is awfully expensive this time of year. I say “this time of year” like it’s nothing, but it’s snowy, icy, below freezing and gray outside, and I’m currently wondering what I’m doing with my life/daydreaming about beach vacations.

As I was saying, kale pesto is a great, affordable option this time of year. I made mine with pecans and I love the subtle, sweet pecan flavor in every bite. You could also use walnuts in your pesto, or pepitas for a nut-free option. This vegan pesto would be fantastic on pasta if you need to warm up with a bowl of hot, steaming pasta. It’s cold outside!

Continue to the recipe…

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Sun-Dried Tomato, Spinach and Quinoa Salad

This simple quinoa salad is perfect for packed lunches! cookieandkate.com

This salad couldn’t come at a better time. I’ve just returned home after a long weekend in Austin, Texas. Taco after taco, margarita after margarita. Chips and salsa in between. On the return home, I ate a scoop of Mexican vanilla ice cream for dinner. It was incredible.

This was a girls’ trip, just for fun, and it was desperately needed. My taste buds got a break from all the cookbook recipe testing and now, I’m craving healthy home cooking once again. Please, remind me to take real vacations more often!

quinoa and spinach

This mega-healthy quinoa and spinach salad was inspired by a Whole Foods buffet salad that I found in Kansas City last week. I was desperate for recipe inspiration, so I sampled a few of their salads and particularly enjoyed their spinach and quinoa salad with pine nuts and sun-dried tomatoes. The sign said the salad had basil in it, but I sure couldn’t find any.

Anyway, I tried to recreate it at home and ended up making a few changes, of course. I swapped more affordable sliced almonds for the pine nuts (they taste better, too), skipped the nonexistent basil, and whipped up a zippy lemon dressing.

Continue to the recipe…

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Roasted Butternut Squash Tacos

These roasted butternut squash tacos with slaw are bursting with flavor and so good for you, too. cookieandkate.com

Just when I thought I couldn’t come up with another recipe, my wonderful hair stylist said, “Tacos.” So here we are, two grocery stores later, with tacos that are as tasty as they are colorful. You need some color to brighten up drab winter days, you know?

butternut squash tacos ingredients

For these tacos, I drew inspiration from my sweet potato tacos and roasted up some cubed butternut squash instead (sweet potatoes would be awesome here, too!). I actually cheated, for once, and used two bags of pre-cut squash from Trader Joe’s. I think I’ll do it again soon.

While the squash roasts in the oven, just mix up some simple cabbage and black bean slaw (a riff on the slaw used in my spaghetti squash burrito bowls) and mash up some guacamole. I have finally learned that mashing guacamole with a pastry cutter or potato masher works way better than a dinky fork. Hallelujah! Hope you love these. Find more tacos over here!

Continue to the recipe…

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Happy 2016! The Year of….

Best Ever Tabbouleh-2

Are you over new years resolutions? I’m not the biggest fan either.

But there is one approach I’ve found super helpful…

Rather than set specific resolutions, I choose a theme or major goal for the coming year.

Last year it was the ‘Year of Fertility’.

And given I’m sitting here with a huge basketball-like growth attached to my stomach, I think we can say it panned out well.

My favourite example was from 2008, the ‘Year of Love & Happiness’. The year I met my Irishman.

I know. Be careful what you wish for.

So for 2016 I’ve decided to have the…

Year of Simplicity!

Although I’ve been a follower of minimalism and simplicity for years now. I’ve found that over the last few years my old habits of taking on too much (and buying too much) have been creeping up on me.

With a new family member coming into the house in Feb, it’s a great opportunity to reset. To be more mindful around my choices.

AND this year my Irishman has volunteered to join me. So we’re going to be taking the Simple Year Program together to help keep us on track.

Another ‘new yearish’ habit I started last year was identifying a handful of ‘quests’ or experiences to tick off my bucket list. I’ve found public accountability really helps me stick to my plans. So here’s how I fared in 2015 and what I’m planning for the year ahead…

My Quests for 2015

1. Cook every meal from David Tanis’ ‘Platter of Figs and Other Recipes’.
I made it through the first half of the year (and book) but after getting pregnant I found I lost all enthusiasm and energy for the project and decided to ‘can’ it.

2. Post one photo on Instagram every day for a year.
BIG fail here! I only averaged a few posts a week. More to me feeling like it was ‘wasting time’ than for any other reason.

3. Eat at every restaurant in Canberra on the Good Food Top 20 list. One more to go! Having lunch at the last one next Tuesday with my assistant Caroline as a belated Stonesoup Christmas party.

4. Have a conversation in French in Paris.
Tick! Although it was with waiter in a restaurant and only got as deep as had my husband already arrived. I had hoped I would wow the lovely Clotilde from Chocolate & Zucchini with my French when we caught up for coffee in Montmartre but I chickened out. Still a conversation is a conversation.

My Quests for 2016

1. Post one photo on Instagram every day for a year.
And although I missed January 1, I’ve posted every day since.

2. Eat at every restaurant in Canberra on the Good Food Top 20 list.
The thing I loved about this last year was it gave me a reason to explore places I wouldn’t otherwise go to with a 2 year old. So am continuing this year. Fortunately there a quite a few new comers to the list to keep it interesting.

3. Meditate Every Day.
After learning transcendental meditation last year, I’ve found it super helpful for calming my mind and living more in the present moment. It also helps with having more patience with a 2 year old. Which can be trying to say the least!

So with a new baby on the way I want to make the commitment to continue my daily practice so it’s not something that ‘falls off’ the radar.

What about you?

Got any big plans, dreams or quests for the year ahead? I’d love to hear about them in the comments below!

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‘Best Ever’ Tabbouleh

Just so you know, I don’t use the term ‘best ever’ lightly. But in this case I really feel it’s well deserved. The first time I made this I thought we were going to have loads of leftovers for breakfast / lunch but my Irishman loved it so much he polished off the whole bowl in one sitting… An accolade usually reserved for dishes involving potatoes… The highest praise!

The other brillant thing is that it’s grain and gluten-free thanks to the addition of almond meal instead of bulghur wheat. Which has the added bonus of giving a richer, creamier salad.

Unlike most salads, this one is fine in the fridge for a few days before serving if you do need to make ahead.

enough for 2-4 as a side
takes 15 minutes
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 bunches flat leaf parsley
1 large red bell pepper (capsicum), diced
handful almond meal

1. Combine lemon juice, 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil and some salt and pepper in a medium salad bowl.

2. Chop parsley leaves and stems as finely as you can be bothered with. Toss in the dressing.

3. Add bell pepper and almond meal. Toss again.

4. Taste, season with extra salt or lemon juice, if needed.

Variations

more herby – replace some of the parsley with mint, coriander (cilantro) or basil.

nut-free – replace almond meal with a few handfuls cooked couscous or quinoa.

more traditional – replace bell pepper with chopped fresh tomatoes.

more substantial – wrap in pita bread or tortillas to eat as a sandwich. Or toss torn pita bread in the salad (with a little more olive oil and lemon to prevent it becoming too dry). Or serve with shredded roast or cooked chicken.

Big love,
Jules x

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PS. Could you benefit from simplifying YOUR life?

Then I encourage you to checkout a special program I’m proud to be a part of. This year as a presenter AND a student!

It’s called ‘A Simple Year‘ and basically it’s a year long program of guided simplicity that focuses on simplifying a different area of your life each month.

Including cooking and eating. Which is where I come in.

For more details go to:
www.simpleyear.co/course

Screen Shot 2015-11-03 at 2.20.54 PM

NOTE: Registration ENDS 31st January.

_____________

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16 Delicious Recipes Featuring Beans & Lentils

Find 16 amazing recipes made with black beans, chickpeas, lentils and more! All of these recipes are vegetarian but rich in protein thanks to the beans. cookieandkate.com

Honestly, I can’t look at the title of this post without hearing my little brothers sing that silly song about beans. We didn’t grow up eating beans. The funny thing is, though, that after I stopped eating meat after college, I naturally started craving them. I quickly discovered that beans are hearty, satisfying, rich in protein and fiber, and gloriously inexpensive. Now that I’ve gotten on the bean bandwagon, my family has, too. Victory!

The United Nations has declared 2016 the International Year of Pulses (pulses are dried legumes like beans, chickpeas and lentils), so you’ll be hearing a lot more about beans over the coming months. I’ve teamed up with the USA Dry Pea and Lentil Council to bring you more recipes with pulses this year. Let’s kick it off with some of my favorite recipes!

Below, you’ll find a wide variety of hearty meals with Mexican, Mediterranean and Italian influences. These are all recipes that will help you meet those healthy New Years resolutions, and they just might change your family’s opinion on meatless meals, too.

For more information about the benefits of pulses and to join me in signing their Pulse Pledge (which is committing to eat one serving of pulses every week), visit PulsePledge.com.

Continue to the recipe…

The post 16 Delicious Recipes Featuring Beans & Lentils appeared first on Cookie and Kate.

Perfect Steel-Cut Oats

Ultra creamy, toasted steel-cut oats. Learn how to cook a batch that lasts all week! cookieandkate.com

Have you seen the prices that restaurants are charging for bowls of steel-cut oats these days? Six dollars! Eight dollars! Twelve dollars in New York! My goodness. Apparently steel-cut oats are the new overpriced grandpa cardigans of the food scene.

Today, I thought I’d share some tricks for making the creamiest, dreamiest steel-cut oats at home. Your bowl will taste like a million bucks. Or, at least ten dollars. I’m concerned that my photos don’t do this oatmeal justice (it’s not easy to make porridge look sexy), but trust me here. We’ll talk toppings later so you can make yours however you’d like.

how to cook steel-cut oats

If you are new to steel-cut oats, I should explain that they are a less refined version of the old-fashioned and quick-cooking oats you already know. All oats start out the same, as an oat groat. Steel-cut oats are oat groats that have been sliced into smaller pieces, whereas old-fashioned oats are oat groats that have been flattened. They all contain the same pieces and parts, but the difference between slicing and flattening explains why steel-cut oats take longer to cook (around 30 minutes).

Nutritionally speaking, they are pretty much the exact same and share all of the health benefits of oats, so don’t split hairs there. Oats lower bad cholesterol, help stabilize blood sugar levels and on and on.

Steel-cut oats shine in the texture and flavor departments. They are exceptionally creamy and delicious, especially if you toast them beforehand as instructed in the recipe below. Steel-cut oats are also a fun way to change up your morning oatmeal routine. Unlike old-fashioned or instant oats, they reheat beautifully, so you can make one big batch that lasts all week.

Continue to the recipe…

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