10 Tasty Things to do with Dukkah

Dukkah

Do you go through phases with your cooking? Are there dishes you make all the time until you move on to the next shiny (I mean delicious) new thing?

I’m totally guilty too.

While I like (and it’s my job!) to keep coming up with new ideas, sometimes there’s a downside to always exploring new flavour sensations.

Sometimes I forget about things I really love to eat.

Which has pretty much been the story of me and dukkah for the past 4 years.

Luckily, this story has a happy ending in that we were reunited a few months ago. And now I can’t get enough!

What is Dukkah?

Dukkah is originally an Egyptian blend of spices, seeds and nuts that is served with olive oil and bread for dipping.

But it’s so much more than just a dip! Dukkah adds lovely crunch and a flavour explosion where ever you use it. And it keeps in the pantry for months!

10 Tasty Things to do with Dukkah

1. With Eggs
My most frequent use for dukkah is to sprinkle on my poached eggs (see below for my current obsession). But it’s also awesome on scrambled or fried. The spices and crunchiness makes a heavenly contrast to rich creamy yolks.

2. With Soft Cheese
Dukkah is amazing with all soft cheese especially a creamy fresh goats cheese, labneh or ricotta. It’s also good with feta but you need to watch you don’t get too much salt from the dukkah and feta combo.

If you’re feeling fancy, you can roll cubes or scoops of the cheese in a dukkah crust.

3. With Yoghurt
When I snack, I love to reach for some home made natural yoghurt. If there’s dukkah in the house I love to sprinkle some on top to take it to the next level.

4. On Salads
Just sprinkle on before serving so you get maximum crunch. The sesame seeds and hazelnuts in the dukkah are a quick way to make your salad more substantial and filling.

5. On Soups
Especially good to add flavour and texture to creamy vegetable soups like my:

6. On Vegetables
Where do I begin! So many ideas! Here are some fave vegetable recipes that would benefit from some Dukkah treatment:

7. As a Crust for Poultry, Meat or Fish
This isn’t something I do often because I worry about burning the nuts. But if you’re up for a technical challenge, you’ll be rewarded with succulent meat / fish and a flavour-packed crunchy crust.

8. On Cooked Poultry, Meat or Fish
Dukkah works with most protein. I especially like to sprinkle it on post-cooking. Will liven up good old halloumi or tofu too!

9. On Avocado
If you’re looking for a way to jazz up your avo on toast, you definitely need to make some dukkah! Avocado and dukkah are friends wherever they find themselves though, so don’t feel like you need to be a toast eater to enjoy the experience. If you’d like to try a Low Carb Avo & Dukkah on Toast I highly recommend my Broccoli Bread.

10. With Fruit
This one takes a little more finesse to get right, so only use a little bit (you can always add more!). I like the earthy cumin and citrussy coriander to enhance the flavours of more subtle fruit like cooked apples, quince or pears. But can imagine it working with strawberries or blueberries as well.

As you can see, I pretty much use my dukkah everywhere. Well, at least anywhere I’d normally add black pepper.

Which reminds me, I need to make more dukkah!

With love,
Jules x

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Buttery Mushrooms with Poached Eggs & Dukkah

This breakfast / lunch / dinner is all about some of my favourite things. Poached eggs! Buttery, garlicky mushrooms! Crunchy nutty, dukkah! And some leaves for greeness. It’s soo soo good.

If you don’t have the time or inclination to make the dukkah, see the ‘no dukkah’ variations below. I’ve just used large button mushrooms in the photo but pretty much any mushroom will work cooked this way.

enough for: 2
takes: 30 minutes
4 tablespoons butter
500g (1lb) mushrooms, sliced if large
2 cloves garlic, sliced
4 poached eggs
6-8 tablespoons dukkah (recipe below)
salad leaves to serve

1. Heat a large frying pan on a medium high heat. Add butter and allow to melt and coat the bottom of the pan before adding the mushies and garlic. Cook, stirring every few minutes until the mushrooms are well browned and tender. If the butter starts to burn, turn the heat down.

2. Taste and season mushrooms with salt, remembering the dukkah is going to add some salt too.

3. Divide mushies between two plates. Top with poached eggs. Sprinkle dukkah over and pop the salad leaves on the side.

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Variations

no dukkah – you really need to sort that out! But in the mean time, the eggs and mushies are amazing with a dollop of home made mayonnaise or just sprinkle over some roasted nuts or seeds to give you that extra flavour and crunch.

carb lovers – pile everything on hot buttered sourdough toast. Or serve with warm flat bread.

different veg – pretty much any roast or pan fried veg will work with the egg and dukkah treatment. I especially love roast broccoli, cauliflower or brussels sprouts.

egg-free – replace poached eggs with some soft cheese. And add a handful roast hazelnuts or almonds for extra substance.

Dukkah

Dukkah is originally an Egyptian blend of spices and nuts that is served with olive oil and bread for dipping. It’s an excellent starter because it can be easily made well in advance. But as you can see from my list above, there are so many more ways to use this flavour and texture explosion! Trust me, you won’t have any problems using it up. The dukkah will keep for a few months in an airtight container in the pantry.

makes: about 2 cups
takes: 15 minutes
300g (10oz) roasted & peeled hazelnuts
100g (3oz) sesame seeds
60g (2oz) ground coriander
60g (2oz) ground cumin
1 teaspoon sea salt flakes

1. In a food processor, blend nuts until you have a chunky meal. Or coarsely chop by hand.

2. Stir in sesame seeds, coriander, cumin & salt. Taste and season with extra salt if needed.

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Variations

to roast the hazelnuts – I usually cheat and buy pre-roasted and peeled because peeling hazelnuts is a pain! Sometimes I pop them in the oven for 5 minutes (200C / 400F) to freshen up before making my dukkah. To roast from scratch pop on a baking tray and roast for 10 minutes or until golden brown and tasty. It’s usually somewhere around the 12 minute mark but may take 15 minutes, depending on your oven. Make sure you set your timer because there’s nothing worse than wasting burnt nuts.

nut free dukkah – replace hazelnuts with a mix of seeds such as sunflower, lindeeds (flax) and pepitas.

different nuts – replace the hazelnuts with roasted almonds, macadamias or cashews or a mixture of your fave nuts.

budget – replace some or all of the hazelnuts with fine bread crumbs.

With love,
Jules
xoxo
www.thestonesoup.com

PS. Want to win a copy of my print book ‘5-Ingredients 10-Minutes?

5 ingredients 10 minutes cover image

I really want to hear from you!
What do you like about Stonesoup? Do you have any ideas to make it better? What would you like to see more of?
Let me know in the comments below.

The winner for this month is Daryle in VT.

A new winner will be chosen early Sept.

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What to Cook This August

Learn what's in season this month at cookieandkate.com!

August is coming to you one day early! Summer is slipping by far too fast. Farmers’ markets are exploding with goodness this month, and fortunately, much of the produce growing now doesn’t need much cooking, if at all. Now’s the time to savor a ripe peach over the sink.

I’m feeling conflicted between spending time on some fun projects and recipes, and soaking up sunshine at the nice pool next door that I’ve only visited once this summer. Can I work by the pool? Now there’s an idea. See link no. 1 below. :)

Continue to the recipe…

The post What to Cook This August appeared first on Cookie and Kate.

Love Real Food in Your Kitchens!

Love Real Food in your kitchens!

Photo credit to @osmiaorganics.

I can’t believe it! It’s been a little over two months since my cookbook baby started landing on your doorsteps. After toiling away on the book for over two years and double-triple-quadruple-octuple-checking every recipe for every tiny detail, I’m completely thrilled and blown away by your enthusiasm for the book. Thank you! Thank you for your kind notes and book reviews, thank you for sharing the book with your friends and buying extras to give as gifts, and thank you for sharing your cookbook recipe results with me on Instagram!

Today, I wanted to share some of the amazing Instagram photos that you have shared with me using the #LoveRealFood hashtag. Please keep them coming! Sometimes, I can’t tell if I love the photo or the caption more. To those who have shared pictures of the book with your pets—you get me and I love you.

Are you enjoying Love Real Food at home? Here are a few ways that you can spread the love:

  • Tell your friends and family about it! In person or online. Or better yet, make them a recipe from the book!
  • Give the book as a gift! It’s very reasonably priced on Amazon right now. Give it to veggie lovers (or to someone who should maybe eat more vegetables), dog lovers, and to new and experience home cooks. Everyone, basically.
  • Look for the book in your local bookstores—if it’s not there, ask the store to start carrying it! If it is there, move a few copies to a more prominent location (I’ve done that, no shame!).
  • Write a review about your experience with the book. Those reviews go a long way in the long-term success of the book, and I am so grateful for your kind words. I read every one! Here’s a list of online retailers where you can review the book: AmazonBarnes & NobleBAM!IndieBoundIndigo

Click through to see what everyone’s been cooking from Love Real Food!
Continue to the recipe…

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Last Chance(!) + Asian Pork & Broccoli

THD 2016 square logo

Hi there!

I’m just putting this little reminder out because I don’t want to get any emails from people who missed out on The Organized Cook…

24 hours after this post is published it’s OVER.

The doors to the Stonesoup Virtual Cookery School (SVCS) will CLOSE because Module 1 of The Organized Cook is being released on Friday.

You have less than 24 hours to join us for The Organized Cook…

To make sure you don’t miss out, use the link below:
http://thestonesoupshop.com/toc/

With love,
Jules x
www.thestonesoup.com
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Asian Pork & Broccoli

I discovered this recipe by accident one night. I was cooking some pork and fennel sausages and had originally been planning an Italian-style dish but the smell of the fennel had such and ‘Asian’ vibe that I just had to change direction. I love when inspiration strikes mid meal!

enough for: 2
takes: 15 minutes
2 smallish heads broccoli, chopped
450g (1lb) pork and fennel sausages, skins removed, meat crumbled
1-4 small red chillies, chopped
4 tablespoons oyster sauce
handful cashews (optional)

1. Preheat a wok or frying pan on a medium high heat. Add broccoli and stir fry until the broccoli is bright green and no longer crunchy. About 5 minutes.

2. Place cooked broccoli in a clean bowl then add a little more oil. Stir fry the sausages until browned and cooked through.

3. Add chilli and return broccoli to the pan. Add oyster sauce and stir fry another minute or until everything is hot.

4. Taste and season with salt and/or more oyster sauce. Serve in bowls with cashews on top (if using).

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Variations

no pork and fennel? – just use plain pork sausages and add 2 teaspoons fennel seeds to the pan. Or a tiny piece of star anise.

vegetarian – replace sausages with crumbled tofu or diced eggplant (aubergine). You’ll need to cook the aubergine with a lid on and for much longer – until it is soft about 15-20 minutes. And use vegetarian oyster sauce or soy sauce.

no oyster sauce – just use soy sauce or hoisin.

more flavour – add a little crushed garlic and/or ginger to the sausages at the end of cooking.

different meat – use any stir fry meat such as chopped chicken breast or thigh fillets, sliced steak, pork fillet or peeled green prawns (shrimp).

more veg – add in any veg that you like to stir fry such as red capsicum (bell pepper), carrots, zucchini, snow peas, sugar snap peas, frozen peas, even baby corn (if that’s your thing). Or serve with baby spinach, cauliflower ‘rice’, coriander leaves (cilantro) or fresh mint.

more substantial – serve with steamed rice or rice noodles cooked according to the packet.

___________________________

ps. Does The Organized Cook really make a difference?

Honestly, I am so thankful for discovering the art of batch cooking. It helps me practically every day, especially now I’m cooking for 2 little ones.

If there’s only one thing do to make your life in the kitchen easier AND less stressful, using the practices in ‘The Organized Cook‘ would seriously be my number one recommendation.

It’s easily the most life-changing program I run.

Here’s what Michael & Liz said…

“TOC has helped me get my cooking done quicker. It’s makes my cooking time more efficient.”
Michael, The Organized Cook Student.

“I LOVED the ‘Organized Cook’ course & have found it’s made a real difference to my cooking habits – and hugely reduced my Thursday ‘urghh… there’s nothing here I want to cook’ attitude. So, thank you so much for that”
Liz, The Organized Cook Student.

pps. I won’t be sending any more reminders.

DOORS CLOSE in 24-hours from when this email was sent.

To make sure you don’t miss out, go to:
http://thestonesoupshop.com/toc/

__________________________

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Colorful Veggie Lettuce Wraps

These healthy lettuce wraps are colorful, fun to eat, and so delicious! They're vegetarian/vegan, and easily gluten free. Get the recipe at cookieandkate.com

Hallelujah for a new week! I’m sure it seemed quiet around here last week, but a lot was going on behind the scenes. This website is now operating like it’s 2017, thanks to a new server with better technology. I think it’s all running properly now, but please let me know if see anything strange—pages not loading properly, features not working, and so forth.

Acronyms and technical terms are still swimming around in my head, but I wasn’t totally out of touch last week. My friends Maria and Jessica launched their helpful new menu planning service, Sweet Peas Meals! Definitely check it out.

I was also working on the site in the early a.m. when Nordstrom’s big annual sale launched, so I snagged some practical items for my family’s upcoming trip to Glacier National Park—including this warm vest, more SmartWool socks (the best) and those leggings that everyone tells me are so great (those are affiliate links). I’ll report back on what proves worthy in my August roundup.

lettuce wrap ingredients

Am I the only one who awaits packages in the mail like Christmas morning? Surely not. Anyway, I’ll quit chatting and tell you about these vegetable lettuce wraps that I promised you last week. It might be hard to tell from the photos, but you’re looking at a crisp butter lettuce leaf topped with edamame hummus, sesame-soy soba noodles, and quick-pickled veggies.

These lettuce wraps are easy to make, fun to look at, and even tastier than they look. They would make a perfect light summer meal or appetizer at your next party. If you plan on having leftovers, just store the individual components separately in the fridge and assemble before serving.

I had a hard time capturing all those vibrant colors in one photograph, so I hope these photos do them proper justice. Please share your results with me on Instagram with the hashtag #cookieandkate!

Continue to the recipe…

The post Colorful Veggie Lettuce Wraps appeared first on Cookie and Kate.

How a Chef Secret can Help You ‘Throw a Meal Together’ without Stress

Lemony Kale with Smoked Trout & Almonds-2

Have you ever wondered how restaurants are able to deliver so many different dishes to your table in a small amount of time?

Well today I’m going to share their ‘secret’.

Basically apart from having lots of staff, restaurants do most of their prep ahead of time. So when the ‘heat is on’ during service they only need to put the finishing touches on each dish.

The technical term is ‘mise en place‘.

What is ‘mise en place?’

Ever eaten at a restaurant with an exposed kitchen so you could watch the chefs at work? And ever noticed all the little containers and bottles of sauces they have at their work stations?

Well you’ve seen ‘mise en place‘ in action.

Mise en place is a French term that roughly translates as ‘put in place’. It’s used to describe the practice of chefs preparing food up to a point where it is ready to be used in a dish during food service.

It may be as simple as washing and picking herbs into individual leaves or chopping vegetables. Or more complicated like caramelizing onions, cooking dried beans or slow cooking meats.

The main benefit in a restaurant is that it makes it much quicker and easier to get food on the table after the customer has ordered.

The secondary benefit is that the preparation can help to extend the shelf life of fresh produce, meaning less waste.

How can this ‘secret’ help you?

1. Save you time.
By taking the time when you can to do a little ‘mise en place’ preparation, we can make it much quicker and easier to get dinner on the table when we come home from work late and everyone is hungry.

2. Reduce waste
Happily, a little bit of preparation can actually extend the shelf life of fresh produce. Which means you have more time to use your precious veg before they go bad.

3. Makes it easy to just ‘throw something tasty together’.
I’ve found that prepping ahead and pretending I’m a chef* with my ‘mise’ has an unexpected benefit… It makes it much easier to look in the fridge and actually get inspiration for what to make for dinner.

There’s something about having at least some of the work done that makes the decision process much easier.

Could you benefit from our little ‘secret’?

Then I invite you to join me for The Organized Cook online program.

The Organized Cook is a 4-week online training program that shows you my simple system for:

  • Getting on top of cooking at home
  • Eating more vegetables
  • Pulling meals together quickly without the ‘last minute’ stress…

To see if it’s right for you go to:
www.thestonesoupshop.com/toc/

NOTE: Registration closes in less than 48-hours.
_________________

“I LOVE the whole ‘Mise en Place’ concept and use it all the time now, it’s saved me so much time. This was a really terrific class!”
Kathleen, The Organized Cook Student.

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Lemony Kale with Smoked Trout & Almonds

Lemony Kale with Smoked Trout & Almonds

Some of my favourite meals involve some take on this quick and easy bowl of goodness. Basically we’re talking a truck load of greens, given a flavour boost with some lemon and garlic and made more substantial with some protein and almonds. For me this is comfort food, like putting on my uggies and getting a big hug.


enough for 2
takes 15 minutes

1 large bunch kale
2-3 cloves garlic, sliced or minced
1-2 lemons
250g (9oz) smoked trout
2 handfuls flaked almonds

1. Wash kale and slice crosswise into ribbons about 1cm (1.3in) thick, discarding the woody stems. Don’t worry about drying, the extra moisture helps the kale to steam.

2. Heat a large pot on a medium high heat. Add a very generous glug of olive oil, the sliced kale and garlic. Cover and cook, stirring every few minutes until the kale is tender and wilted. If it starts to burn add a splash of water.

3. Remove pot from the heat. Season kale generously with salt, pepper and a big squeeze of lemon (or more if you like it really zingy).

4. To serve, divide kale between two bowls and top with fish and almonds.

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Variations

vegetarian – replace fish with extra almonds, cooked chickpeas, crumbled feta or blue cheese, or poached eggs.

nut-free – skip the almonds or replace with toasted bread crumbs.

different greens – I love Tuscan kale here but any greens are good. Try different types of kale, collard greens, spinach or chard (silverbeet). Frozen spinach can also be used – no need to slice, just defrost and cook uncovered so you get rid of the excess moisture.

different protein – anything cooked will work. Think smoked salmon, pan fried sliced chorizo or other spicy sausages, crispy bacon, shaved parmsean, canned fish (hello sardines!), leftover cooked meat or poached or fried eggs.

creamy – stir in a few tablespoons double cream with the lemon juice.

extra zesty – add the zest of the lemons with the juice.

carb-lovers / more substantial – toss in cooked pasta or serve the kale piled on hot buttered sourdough toast.

different nuts – I really love almonds with the trout but feel free to use whatever nuts you have, it will taste better if they’re roasted but it won’t be the end of the world if you can’t be bothered! I often don’t.

With love,
Jules xx

(*for the record I’m not a chef. Just a self-taught cook with a degree in Food Science.)

ps. Not sure if The Organized Cook will help you?

Of all the courses I’ve created, ‘The Organized Cook’ is the one that gets the most positive feedback from my students making real, lasting changes to their cooking and their lives. It’s also the one that helps me the most in my own kitchen.

Here’s how it’s already helped Liz and Anke…

“This course really helped me to learn methods of preparing for the week ahead and it’s not complicated and ingredients are budget friendly. We are eating more vegetables, lentils and getting meals on the table doesn’t take as long. I’m also getting lots of compliments of dinners. I’m cooking more at home rather than eating out. It’s just quicker and tastier than takeaway food! We are so very thankful for your recipes, we have lots of new family favourites that are quick and easy!”
Liz, The Organized Cook Student.

“The Organized Cook means less last-minute stress, more relaxed cooking. I would recommend it because it reduces stress when it comes to cooking and shopping”
Anke, The Organized Cook Student.

pps. Doors CLOSE in less than 48-hours!

To make sure you don’t miss out go to:
www.thestonesoupshop.com/toc/

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How I Organize My Fridge

Super Tender Broccoli

When I was backpacking around the world in my 20s there were 2 things that I really missed…

My own bed.

And my own fridge.

I guess I also did miss having a proper kitchen. But every time I tried to squeeze my fresh ingredients into a smelly, chaotic youth hostel shared fridge, that was the part I really struggled with.

Ever since then I’ve always been so thankful for having my own cold storage space. And while it isn’t clean and tidy 100% of the time, I do take a certain pride in keeping it organized.

So today I’m going to share the 5 key principles I follow.

How I Organize My Fridge

1. Keep most in need of using items visible.
It’s so easy to forget what you have. So my first rule is to place anything that needs ‘eating up’ where you can’t miss seeing it each time you open the fridge.

It’s a small thing but makes a HUGE difference to how much food I waste.

2. Keep like things together.
This is just how my brain works. I have separate places for my cheese, my raw meats, fresh veg, prepped ingredients, my fermented veg and of course my champagne!

3. Have a regular place for different ingredients.
This just makes it easier to find what you’re looking for. So I know that half used jar of curry paste will be in he fridge door instead of having to rummage around to find it.

4. Really look once a day.
I don’t know about you, but my memory isn’t the greatest these days. So I try and have a good look in all parts of the fridge at least once a day.

This way I remember what I have and get heaps more ideas for what to cook. Plus I can move things that really need eating to a more visible position so I’m less likely to waste food. Win win!

5. Keep things covered.
The air in the fridge is really dry. The number 1. cause of food spoilage is dehydration, especially for fresh produce. So I keep all my fruit and veg in plastic bags either in the crisper or on the bottom shelf. It doesn’t look so pretty but really makes a difference to how long things last.

For leftovers and my prepped ingredients I use glass containers with plastic lids.

A Video Tour of My Fridge

Watch on YouTube

Like more?

Then I’d love you to join me for The Organized Cook!

Registration is NOW OPEN for The Organized Cook, a 4-week online training program that shows you my simple system for:

  • Getting on top of cooking at home
  • Eating more vegetables
  • Pulling meals together quickly without the ‘last minute’ stress…

To see if it’s right for you go to:
www.thestonesoupshop.com/toc/

With love,
Jules xx

ps. Not sure if you have time to sign up?

Think about it, you’re always going to have lots going on. Wouldn’t life be so much easier if you had your kitchen organization handled? Imagine if you could free up some time for other areas of your life?

That’s why you get access to the program for life. So you’ll always be able to fit it into the timing that works best for you.

For more details go to:
www.thestonesoupshop.com/toc/

——

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Edamame Hummus

This edamame hummus recipe is fresh, healthy and delicious! It's a fun alternative to regular hummus and pairs well with traditional Mediterranean or Asian flavors. cookieandkate.com

Minneapolis is one delicious city. I haven’t unpacked my bags yet, but I have a list of recipe ideas from the past week and can’t wait to recreate them. Let’s procrastinate on unpacking and catching up on emails for a bit longer and talk about a much more pressing matter—edamame hummus. Have you tried it yet?

I got a taste of edamame hummus at a nearby sushi restaurant recently, then I discovered a tubbed version at Trader Joe’s, and then I had to make some myself. It’s rich, lemony, and high in protein (so is the traditional chickpea kind). It’s green, too, thanks to the edamame, which are green soybeans. I buy frozen, shelled edamame and defrost them in a pot of boiling water.

edamame hummus ingredients

The word “hummus” is derived from the Arabic word for chickpeas, so this chickpea-free hummus is quite untraditional. To balance edamame’s very green flavor and fibrous texture, I had to use a little more tahini, lemon juice and water than my go-to herbed hummus recipe.

Combined with crisp veggies or whole-grain crackers, edamame hummus is a delicious, healthy snack or appetizer. If you need a break from standard hummus (horrors!), please give this one a shot! I’ll be sharing a fun appetizer concept featuring this hummus in a couple of days.

Fun news about Love Real Food:

Continue to the recipe…

The post Edamame Hummus appeared first on Cookie and Kate.

Edamame Hummus

This edamame hummus recipe is fresh, healthy and delicious! It's a fun alternative to regular hummus and pairs well with traditional Mediterranean or Asian flavors. cookieandkate.com

Minneapolis is one delicious city. I haven’t unpacked my bags yet, but I have a list of recipe ideas from the past week and can’t wait to recreate them. Let’s procrastinate on unpacking and catching up on emails for a bit longer and talk about a much more pressing matter—edamame hummus. Have you tried it yet?

I got a taste of edamame hummus at a nearby sushi restaurant recently, then I discovered a tubbed version at Trader Joe’s, and then I had to make some myself. It’s rich, lemony, and high in protein (so is the traditional chickpea kind). It’s green, too, thanks to the edamame, which are green soybeans. I buy frozen, shelled edamame and defrost them in a pot of boiling water.

edamame hummus ingredients

The word “hummus” is derived from the Arabic word for chickpeas, so this chickpea-free hummus is quite untraditional. To balance edamame’s very green flavor and fibrous texture, I had to use a little more tahini, lemon juice and water than my go-to herbed hummus recipe.

Combined with crisp veggies or whole-grain crackers, edamame hummus is a delicious, healthy snack or appetizer. If you need a break from standard hummus (horrors!), please give this one a shot! I’ll be sharing a fun appetizer concept featuring this hummus in a couple of days.

Fun news about Love Real Food:

Continue to the recipe…

The post Edamame Hummus appeared first on Cookie and Kate.

The 3 Biggest Myths about being an Organized Cook

salt & vinegar steaks

Over the last few months, I’ve spent a lot of time talking to my students from my online cooking school.

I always enjoy chatting on the phone or Skype with my students from all over the world. It’s fun but more importantly it gives me valuable insights into what people need help with.

One theme that kept coming up was getting to the end of the day and having that feeling of panic or dread…

‘Oh no! I’ve got to pull a meal together. What will I do?’

One of the best antidotes to this ‘affliction’ is to be a bit more organized. But I know there are some myths that hold people back from getting on top of it.

So let’s get into some myth busting!

The 3 Biggest Myths about being an Organized Cook

Myth 1. If you’re organized there’s less flexibility and freedom.
This ties in with the misconception that being organized means you have to pre-cook loads of complete meals.

But there is another way!

If you focus on prepping ingredients instead there can be loads of room for flexibility and creativity. I find it actually sparks ideas.

And even better, cooking this way means you can ‘pull together’ healthy meals really quickly which means you’re much more likely to eat at home.

As André said:
“Since completing The Organized Cook I am eating more at home because now I need less time to cook.”

Myth 2. You have to spend hours in the kitchen sacrificing your precious weekend time.
People often tell me that a lack of time is their biggest obstacle on the path to organization.

But here’s the thing, you don’t need to dedicate huge chunks of time to make a difference.

The key is to develop a strategy to help you be more efficient with the time you’re already spending.

For example, I often pop on some veg to roast (1 hour but 2 minutes active time) or cook up a pot of rice for Fergal and Finbar (15 minutes) while I’m cooking for today.

If you’d like to explore more strategies for being efficient in the kitchen I’m going to be going much deeper in my new online program, The Organized Cook, which I hope you’ll join me for.

Myth 3. Pre-prepared food is not as healthy as fresh.
Just because fresh food is healthy, doesn’t necessarily mean that food cooked in advance is not.

Whenever we cut or cook food we’re exposing it to oxidation and light or heat. So any light, oxygen or heat sensitive nutrients will be lost during food prep.

Whether we eat the food straight away or store it and eat in a few days time doesn’t make a significant difference. Most of the sensitive nutrients will have already been lost either way.

The way I look at it, if prepping ahead means I’m going to eat more veggies, this totally outweighs any slight loss in nutrition from prepping and storing.

Ready to be feel more Organized?

Well now’s your chance!

Registration is NOW OPEN for The Organized Cook, a 4-week online training program that shows you my simple system for:

  • Getting on top of cooking at home
  • Eating more vegetables
  • Pulling meals together quickly without the ‘last minute’ stress…

To see if the Organized Cook is right for you go to:
http://thestonesoupshop.com/toc/

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salt & vinegar steaks-2

Salt & Vinegar Steaks

When I was growing up ‘salt and vinegar’ was my favourite flavour of potato chips (crisps). But it wasn’t until my brother was staying with me and cooked his version of these salt and vinegar steaks that I had the inspiration to use that classic flavour combo in my cooking. Thanks Dom!

enough for: 2
takes: 30 minutes
1 bunch broccolini or broccoli, chopped
2 steaks
4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
sea salt flakes

1. Remove steaks from the fridge preferably an hour before you want to cook them, or as long as you’ve got.

2. For the dressing, combine vinegar with 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil.

3. Heat a frying pan on a medium high heat. Add a little olive oil and the broccoli / broccolini and a splash of water. Cover and cook stirring every few minutes until the veg are no longer crunchy, about 5-10 minutes. Place veg in a clean bowl.

4. Increase heat to medium high. Rub steaks with a little oil and sprinkle with salt.

5. Cook steaks for 3-5 minutes each side, or until cooked to your liking.

5. Place steak on 2 plates. Drizzle over dressing and allow to rest for 5-10 minutes before serving with the broccolini / broccoli on top and extra sea salt flakes.

Variations

different salt – my brother loves commercial garlic salt or onion salt with his steak.

vegetarian – replace steaks with sliced halloumi cheese. Pan fry halloumi on a medium heat until golden brown on both sides. No need to rest the halloumi before tucking in. OR replace steak with hummus + a handful of almonds.

vegan – try salt and vinegar beans. Replace steaks with a drained can of your favourite beans. Warm in the pan and serve with the veg and dressing. Consider adding a handful or roasted almonds or pine nuts for some extra protein and crunch.

different veg – replace broccoli or broccolini with sliced zucchini, snow peas, frozen peas, sugar snap peas or red bell peppers (capsicum). Or just serve steaks with salad leaves on the side.

more substantial – lovely with mashed potatoes, roast potato or fries, cauliflower mash or a packet of your favourite potato crisps (chips). Or just serve some crusty bread and butter.

different meat – also great with pork chops, lamb chops or lamb cutlets. I also love salt and vinegar sausages (simmer sausages in water for 10-15 minutes before draining and browning in a little oil in the pan).

pescetarian – replace steaks with fish and replace balsamic with lemon juice.

different vinegar / sugar-free – I love the sweetness of balsamic here but you could use any wine or rice vinegar. Sherry vinegar is also a hit.

more veg – serve a green salad on the side.

low carb – I use a cheap balsamic which is lower carb. For strict low carb use 2 tablespoons wine or sherry vinegar instead. For more easy Low Carb ideas check out my new website Deliciously Diabetic.

With love,
Jules x
www.thestonesoup.com

ps. Not sure if The Organized Cook can help you?

Here’s what Samantha and Pat said about their experience…

“I’m planning more often and are more confident in trusting my instincts. Being better prepared has kept us from eating out too often.”
Samantha, The Organized Cook Student.

“I am planning ahead more often and have less anxiety when it come time to cook the evening meal. The Organized Cook helps simplify the meal planning and preparation process. And access to all of the healthy recipes is great!”
Pat, The Organized Cook Student.

For more details use your link below:
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